Which Indoor Plant Like to Stay in the Summer Garden

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Which Indoor Plant Like to Stay in the Summer Garden
Which Indoor Plant Like to Stay in the Summer Garden

With the arrival of warmth, the garden begins to bloom with colorful heat-loving plants and seasonal decorations. And beloved annuals don’t move into the garden alone. Many houseplants are happy to trade in the familiar stability of the living room for an outdoor space. For some, gardens and patios are ideal places to prepare for a burst of activity, while others offer the perfect opportunity to regenerate and restore their usual lush greenery. Still, others are fresh air lovers who can feel comfortable in the garden during the hot summer months. You will learn how to grow Summer garden plants in ThumbGarden’s article.


GARDENING “HOLIDAYS” AND THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF HOUSEPLANTS

Gardening holidays and the Health Benefits of Houseplants
Gardening holidays and the Health Benefits of Houseplants

The annual “vacation” in the garden is a welcome opportunity for houseplants to enjoy bright light and lots of fresh air.
Once the temperature rises enough for houseplants to feel comfortable outside, most indoor plants will happily change their usual “indoor” environment and go to the open space of a balcony or garden.

Not only that, but plants tolerate the summer heat more easily in the fresh air. You often underestimate or overlook the fact that access to fresh air is a prerequisite for the health and growth of indoor plants. However, it is just as important as humidity, watering, or lighting.

Some form of ventilation is a must for every plant at any stage of development. Without an air bath, the foliage becomes duller, the color disappears, canopy lushness and growth rates suffer, but most importantly, pest resistance is reduced many times over. Moving outside to balconies and gardens during the warmer months is the best way to meet your plants’ “ventilation” needs.

Humidity drops indoors in the summer, and if many plants need a lot of care, bringing them into the garden will avoid the extra daily handling. In addition, summer outdoor temperatures are ideal for plants that like the contrast between day and night. And light-loving plants can enjoy long, long periods of light without suffering from a lack of space on the windowsill.


WHERE TO PUT HOUSEPLANTS IN THE GARDEN IN SUMMER?

Potted plants in the garden can be placed in a space with enough protection from wind, cold drafts, the danger of tipping, and heavy rain. Moisture-loving plants and potted plants that prefer sprays and showers can also cope with rain, which will keep watering to a minimum, while other plants prefer sheltered areas.

Indoor plant displays.

  1. On decks and seating areas.
  2. At the entrance of the house, on porches and balconies.
  3. Next to buildings, walls.
  4. In large bonsai gardens.
  5. In gazebos, pavilions, and other small structures, etc.

Garden and indoor species and plants that are not hardy or afraid of rainfall can be buried or planted in the ground rather than on display.

Planting out or bringing them into the garden is not the only way to outdoors indoor plants. You can put houseplants on a balcony or wooden porch, or at the very least, by a window or door that is permanently hidden (if the use of the room and the comfort of the home make ventilation possible, which doesn’t happen often).


WHICH HOUSEPLANTS SHOULD NOT BE MOVED OUT INTO THE FRESH AIR IN THE SUMMER?

You don’t start preparing to bring your houseplants into the garden by looking for shipping locations and strategies, but by selecting plants. First, you need to “weed out” any plants that would not benefit from moving to fresh air.

The information is as follows.

  1. Those needing a stable temperature with no jumps above 37-41 °F (3-5°C).
  2. Those accustomed to strictly stable light and afraid of movement.
  3. Who cannot even tolerate temperatures as low as 60-64 °F (16-18°C) at night.
  4. Fear of drafts.
  5. Grows in botanical gardens, floral showrooms, or stable high humidity environments.

Information on keeping plants outdoors is often included in recommendations for the conditions and temperature regimes under which the species should be kept.

There are not many plants that should not be kept outdoors. African violets, Laceleaf, Maranta, Monstera, Alocasia, Philodendron, Nephrolepis, Gloxinia, Achimenes, Aeschynanthus, Moth orchids, Cymbidium aloifolium and other orchids (with the exception of Cymbidium grandiflorum) are not suitable for growing in the garden.

In addition to them, it is never a good idea to subject them to additional stress.

  1. Plants affected by pests or disease.
  2. Plants that have just been transplanted (especially after an emergency transplant).
  3. Weakened crops.
  4. Very young seedlings and plugs immediately after rooting.

WHICH HOUSEPLANTS CAN AND SHOULD BE MOVED INTO THE GARDEN IN THE SUMMER?

Which Houseplants Can and Should be Moved into the Garden in the Summer
Which Houseplants Can and Should be Moved into the Garden in the Summer

Most subtropical, tropical, desert and montane plants are suitable for moving to the garden. All plants that combine the status of indoor and garden plants, extremely light-demanding species, prefer fresh air, and cannot grow in rooms with high temperatures are considered a must for moving outdoors.

In particular, shrubs, fruit trees, flowering plants, vines, bulbs, and tubers that do not tolerate winter in our country but grow in the south cannot develop properly without a vacation in the garden.

If possible (and hopefully so), remove species that prefer diurnal temperature differences, plants that do not tolerate high temperatures, plants that bloom in autumn and winter, and plants that have difficulty providing a proper dormancy period indoors.

Plants that are best left out of the garden in the summer include

citrus;
Garnet;
palm trees;
yucca;
hibiscus;
bougainvillea;
oleander;
clivia;
adenium;
acokantera;
pelargonium;
laurel;
myrtle;
yew;
araucaria;
sheffler;
fatshedera;
asparagus;
cyclamens;
jasmine;
paciflora;
abutilone;
decorative pepper;
fuchsia;
piggy;
cacti;
aloe;
roses;
gerberas;
primroses;
balsams;
helksina;
hydrangeas;
ivy;
amaryllis;
poinsettia;
ferns;
rhododendrons;
camellias.

If possible, you can also place flowering begonias, pentas, eustoma, dracaena, sansevieria, cordilina, dieffenbachia, chlorophytums, agave, bromeliads, zamioculcas, aralia, cymbidium, etc. on balconies and in the garden.


SIMPLE RULES FOR MOVING HOME POTTED PLANTS INTO THE GARDEN IN SUMMER

When choosing a location, two factors are light and shelter. Light can be explicitly classified. Sun-loving plants can be placed in diffused light, light-loving plants in semi-shade, and plants that are used to shade in the shade.

Even wormwood, colostrums, hollyhocks, lemon oranges, and hibiscus cannot cope with the south side of the house and the hot, scorching sun. For houseplants, it is best to choose a spot that enjoys morning and evening sun rather than the midday sun, the north or east side of a building, or scattered shade under deciduous trees.

All houseplants in the garden should be protected from the wind. Only plants with fragile shoots or fuzzy foliage (plants that do not like to be sprayed are easily identified) need protection from precipitation altogether.

It is always best to bring them into the garden, but sudden changes in conditions should not be the case.” With no exceptions, all houseplants need a ‘buffer’ or quarantine period. They are usually kept in a cool, shaded area for a few days (3 to 7 days) before being moved to their primary location.

You can also handle this differently by taking the plants out for a few hours and gradually increasing the time outdoors to allow the potted plants to acclimate to the new conditions slowly.

Only start taking houseplants out of the garden when nighttime temperatures are consistently above the minimum allowable temperature for a given species. Waiting until the threat of a return frost is over is not enough: hardy houseplants should only be removed when temperatures are above 53 °F (12 °C), and for most plants, it is best to wait until temperatures are around 59 °F (15 °C).

Typically, you should start moving them out to the central region at the end of June. Another reference point is the difference between nighttime and daytime temperatures. They should not exceed 50 °F (10 °C). Of course, if you can bring the plants back in unfavorable weather, then you have more time to choose when putting them into the garden. Choose cloudy, cool, and windless days for your garden.

Care should be taken to maintain the usual conditions. Watering should be adjusted according to precipitation and the rate at which the soil dries out, while fertilization should remain the same. However, plants should be checked more frequently to detect problems and signs of pests in a timely manner.

More Related Information About Growing Houseplant

Title: Which Indoor Plant Like to Stay in the Summer Garden
Source: ThumbGarden
Link: https://www.thumbgarden.com/like-to-stay-in-the-summer-garden/
The copyright belongs to the author. For commercial reprints, please contact the author for authorization, and for non-commercial reprints, please indicate the source.

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